• Overview

    Author(s)
    Donna Cross and Erin Erceg
    Who is this for?
    Children/Students, Parents/Carers, Primary teachers and staff
    Who is this from?
    Classroom teachers
    Domains
    Mentally Healthy Communities
    Settings
    Primary School
    Topics
    Social and emotional learning, Bullying and cyber safety, Connectedness and relationships
    Aims
    The primary aim of Friendly Schools Plus is to reduce and prevent bullying and enhance social skills among students in all schools.
    Cost
    Primary Complete Pack: $350.00 (incl. GST)| Classroom only Primary Years: $110.00 (incl. GST)| Whole School Complete Pack: $475.00 (incl. GST)
    Location
    Victoria, New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory, Queensland, Northern Territory, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania
    Organisation
    Erin Erceg (based in Perth), National Director FSP, Hawker Brownlow Education
    Address
    PO Box 580 Moorabbin VIC 3189
    Phone number
    03 8558 2444
    Mobile number
    0448 103 023
    Fax number
    (03) 8558 2400
    Email
    erin.erceg@hbe.com.au
  • Implementation

    Detailed description

    Friendly Schools Plus Whole-school Approach Friendly Schools is Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Anti-bullying Initiative for schools developed through extensive research with Australian children and adolescents. It is recognised nationally and internationally as a comprehensive, evidence-based approach that can reduce bullying behavior The Friendly Schools Plus takes a whole-school approach to reduce bullying and cyberbullying that involves students, staff, families and the school community. Current research highlights the importance of a whole-school multi-component approach to increase the likelihood of reducing bullying and increasing social and emotional learning rather than a single-component program approach. Friendly Schools Plus provides a systematic implementation process to enable schools to assess the social and emotional wellbeing of their students, examine their existing strategies for bullying prevention, identify areas in need of improvement and then address these gaps using widely tested strategies. Friendly Schools Plus Whole-school Pack Evidence for Practice - Team Handbook is the research-based text that informs the Friendly Schools Plus program, which aims to reduce bullying and promote social and emotional learning. By assisting schools to identify evidence-based practices that align with their needs, Evidence for Practice supports sustainable changes to policy and to the school's social and physical climate and links with families, all of which can be achieved by implementing the practice strategies and using toolkits provided. For schools that have already taken action in these areas, Evidence for Practice will offer the opportunity to review action, identify areas for improvement and engage in activities that maintain or enhance the existing processes. For schools that have not yet taken action, this book provides guidance for a school team to develop and engage in a whole-school process to reduce and prevent bullying and increase social and emotional competence. Evidence for Practice provides six components detailing evidence-base key elements and strategies to address these elements within each whole-school component. These components are designed to guide the coordinating team to develop an action plan for whole-school improvement. Six whole-school components • Component 1 - Building capacity • Component 2 - Supportive school culture • Component 3 - Proactive policies and practices • Component 4 - Key understandings and competencies • Component 5 - Protective physical environment • Component 6 - School-family-community partnerships The Friendly Schools Plus "Map-the-Gap" can be used as a quick online screening tool to help schools identify what they are doing well and what they need to build on in each of the whole-school components. Schools are then assisted by this Evidence for Practice book to identify evidence-based practices to address their needs. • Family Booklet |The Family Booklet contains information and tips for parents about how to cope effectively with bullying. The book focuses on prevention strategies including opening communication between parent and child, giving tips to parents to help improve the social skills of their child, and strategies for children to manage bullying should it occur. • Student and Staff Surveys - two reliable self-administered, online surveys for students and staff to help determine students' understandings, attitudes, competencies and behaviour. Friendly Schools Plus Primary Teacher Pack This revised edition of the Friendly Schools Plus Teacher Pack provides evidence-based classroom materials to enhance social and emotional learning and to reduce bullying. The Friendly Schools Plus classroom resources take on a strengths-based approach, designed to improve social and emotional development in areas such as social knowledge and social skills and promoting positive peer relationships and teacher-child relationships. The classroom teaching resources link directly to the General Capabilities outlined in the Australian Curriculum under 'Personal and Social Capability'. The Friendly Schools Plus series aims to develop students' social and emotional competencies. Outcomes are developed through the following five focus areas: • Self-awareness • Self-management • Social awareness • Relationship skills • Social decision-making The Teacher Resources includes information and strategies to help teachers to enhance social skills in their classroom environment. Teacher resource books for each year level are designed for students aged between 4 - 13 years include learning activities about how to reduce and prevent bullying, with a strong emphasis on resilience, positive communication, self-management and social responsibility. Teacher pack for Primary Schools comprise: • Classroom Teaching and Learning Handbooks (Early childhood and Foundation) • Classroom Teaching and Learning Handbooks (YEAR 1 to Year 6) - Each book contains Activity Sheets and/or a Reflection Sheet for each of the modules with download resources available online • Poster Set (11 posters per set) Teacher pack for Secondary Schools comprise: • Classroom Teaching and Learning Handbooks (Year 7 to Year 9) Each book contains Activity Sheets and/or a Reflection Sheet for each of the modules with download resources available online. • For Secondary students Year 10 - Year 12 Cyber Strong section of the Friendly Schools Website includes resources to help school staff to train and support students to be student leaders, encouraging and enabling other young people to use technology in positive ways

    Program structure & method delivery

    The whole-school implementation process The Friendly Schools Plus initiative recognises that many schools have already begun to take whole-school action to address bullying and are already engaged in promoting and implementing strategies for reducing bullying and promoting social and emotional learning. For these schools, this manual provides the opportunity to review action, identify areas that may require further attention and to engage in activities that will maintain or enhance action. For schools that have not yet taken action, this section provides guidance for a school coordinating committee for developing and engaging in a whole-school process to reduce and prevent bullying developing social and emotional competence. Implementation of the Friendly Schools initiative is designed as a staged process, where each stage builds upon the others in a continuous and interactive manner. The Friendly Schools Implementation Road Map guides schools through the entire implementation journey, from getting ready to reviewing and sustaining outcomes. It is a visual representation of the five stages of implementation, each broken down into a series of 14 steps outlining sequential actions to guide school teams though the process. The research-based Evidence for Practice contains a comprehensive guide to the implementation process and provides information and a range of strategies and resources from real Australian schools to support each individual step.

    Student assessment measures

    Yes

    Professional learning compulsory

    No

    Professional Learning Available

  • Evidence

    Identified theoretical framework

    This universal intervention provides a variety of whole-school strategies based on the Health Promoting Schools model to increase understanding and awareness of bullying; increase communication about bullying; promote adaptive responses to bullying; promote peer and adult support for students who are bullied; and promote peer as well as adult discouragement of bullying behaviour. The program also addresses research evidence suggesting that the development of resilience, positive-self esteem, empathy, cooperation, friendship skills, social skills, self management skills, decision making, emotional management and conflict resolution can help to protect people from the harmful effects of bullying, as well as helping them to build positive peer relationships.

    References

    Recent books and book chapters Cross, D., Barnes, A. (In press 2014). Protecting and promoting young people's social and emotional health and wellbeing in online and offline contexts. In Wynn, J. & Cahill, H. (Eds) Handbook of Children and Youth Studies. Melbourne: Springer. ISBN 978-981-4451-14-7. Cross, D., Barnes, A. (2014). One size doesn't fit all: Rethinking implementation research for bullying prevention. In Schott R.M. and Søndergaard, D.M (Eds), School Bullying: New Theories in Context, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cross, D., Shaw, T., Monks, H., Waters, S., Lester, L. (2013). Using evidence to reduce bullying among girls. In Pepler, D.J. & Ferguson, B. (Eds.) Girls' Aggressive Behaviour Problems: A Focus on Relationships. Kitchener ON: Wilfred Laurier Press. Cross, D., Campbell, M., Slee, P., Spears, B., Barnes, A. (2013). Australian research to encourage school students' positive use of technology to reduce cyberbullying. In Smith, P.K., Steffgen, G. (Eds) Cyberbullying Through the New Media: Findings from an International Network. New York: Psychology Press. O'Moore, M., Cross, D., Valimaki, M., Almeida, A., Berne, S., Deboutte, G., Fandrem, H., Olenik-Shemesh, D., Heiman, T., Kurki, M., Fulop, M., Sygkollitou, E., and Stald, G. (2013). Guidelines to prevent cyber-bullying: A cross-national review. In Smith, P.K., Steffgen, G. (Eds) Cyberbullying through the New Media: Findings from an International Network. New York: Psychology Press. ISBN: 1848722540. Boronenko, V., Ucanok, Z., Slee, P., Campbell, M., Cross, D., Spears, B., Valimaki, M. (2013). Training researchers: visits and training schools. In Smith, P.K., Steffgen, G. (Eds) Cyberbullying Through the New Media: Findings from an International Network. New York: Psychology Press. Bauman, S., Cross, D., Walker, J. (Eds). (2012). Principles of Cyberbullying Research: Definition, Methods and Measures. New York: Routledge. Li, Q., Cross, D., Smith, P.K (Eds). (2012). Cyberbullying in the Global Playground: Research from International Perspectives. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Cross, D., Shaw, T., Dooley, J.J., Epstein, M., Hearn, L. & Monks, H. (2012). Cyberbullying in Australia: Is school context related to cyberbullying behaviour? In Q. Li, D. Cross, & P.K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the Global Playground: Research from International Perspectives. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell ISBN 978-1-4443-3376-3 Li, Q., Smith, P.K., Cross, D. (2012). Research into Cyberbullying: Context. In Q. Li, D. Cross, & P. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the Global Playground: Research from International Perspectives. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-4443-3376-3. Cross, D., Li, Q. Smith, P. & Monks, H. (2012). Understanding and Preventing cyberbullying: Where have we been and where should we be going? In Q. Li, D. Cross, & P.K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the Global Playground: Research from International Perspectives. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Cross, D., Walker, J. (2012). Using research to inform cyberbullying prevention and intervention. In Bauman, S, Cross, D., Walker, J. (Eds) Principles of Cyberbullying Research: Definition, Methods and Measures. Routlege Bauman, S., Cross, D. (2012). Methods: Guiding principles. In Bauman, S, Cross, D., Walker, J. (Eds) Principles of Cyberbullying Research: Definition, Methods and Measures. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-89749-5. Campbell, M., Spears, B., Cross, D., & Slee, P. (2011). Cyberbullying in Australia. In J.A. Mora-Merchán, & Jäger, T. (Eds.) Cyberbullying: A cross-national comparison (pp. 232-244). Landau: Verlag Empirische Pädagogik. Selected recent journal articles Waters S, Lester L, Cross D. (In press 2014). Transition from primary to secondary school: Expectation vs experience. Australian Journal of Education. Runions, K., Vitaro, F., Biovin, M., Cross, D., Hall, M. (In press 2014). Increasing, decreasing and stable trajectories of overt physical aggression and the teacher-child relationship in the early school years. International Journal of Behavioural Development. Cross, D., Shaw, T., Barnes, A., Monks, H., Pearce, N., Epstein, M. (In press 2014). Evaluating the capacity of Australian school staff to recognise and respond to cyberbullying behaviours. Le reinforcement de la capacité des établissements scolaires et des enseignants à développer une culture d'établissement contre la cyberviolence et le cyberharcèlement. Evaluation de la capacité des personnels scolaires australiens à identifier et prendre en charge les problèmes de cyberharcèlement In C. Blaya, Cyberviolence et Climat Scolaire. Les Dossiers des Sciences de l'Education. Cross, D., Barnes, A. (In press 2014). Using Systems Theory to understand and respond to family influences on children's bullying behaviour: Friendly Schools, Friendly Families program; Journal of Theory into Practice, Special Issue: Bullying and Cyberbullying. Autumn. Lester, L. & Cross, D. (2014). Do emotional and behavioural difficulties in primary school predict adolescent victimisation trajectories? Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Published online, DOI: 10.1080/13632752.2013.876854. Cross, D. (2013). Using the Health Promoting Schools Model to reduce harm from school bullying. Japanese Journal of School Health, 55, 111-119. Shaw, T., Dooley, J.J., Cross, D, Zubrick, S.R. & Waters, S. (2013). The Forms of Bullying Scale (FBS): Validity and reliability estimates for a measure of bullying victimization and perpetration in early adolescence. Psychological Assessment, 25(4), 1045-1057. Lester, L., Waters, S., & Cross, D. (2013). The relationship between school connectedness and mental health during the transition to secondary school: A path analysis. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 23(2), 157-171. Lester L., Cross D., Dooley J., Shaw T. (2013). Bullying victimisation and adolescents: Implications for school-based intervention programs. Australian Journal of Education, 57(2), 107-123. Cross, D., Waters, S., Pearce, T., Shaw, T., Hall, M., Erceg, E., Burns, S., Roberts, C., Hamilton, G. (2012). The Friendly Schools Friendly Families Program: Three-year bullying behavior outcomes in primary school children. International Journal of Educational Research, 53, 394-406. Dooley, J.J., Shaw, T., Cross, D. (2012). The association between the mental health and behavioural problems of students and their reactions to cyber-victimisation. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9(2), 275-289 Lester, L., Cross, D., Shaw, T. (2012). Problem behaviours, traditional bullying and cyberbullying among adolescents: longitudinal analyses, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 17(3-4), 435-447. Lester, L., Cross, D., Shaw, T., Dooley, J. (2012). Adolescent bully-victims: Social health and the transition to secondary school. Cambridge Journal of Education; 42(2), 213-233. Lester, L., Cross, D., Shaw, T., Dooley, J. (2012). Adolescent bully-victims: Social health and the transition to secondary school. Cambridge Journal of Education; 42(2), 213-233. Shaw, T., Cross, D. (2012). The clustering of bullying and cyberbullying behaviours within Australian schools. Australian Journal of Education, 56(2), 142-162. Baxendale, S., Cross, D., Johnston, R. (2012). A review of the evidence on the relationship between gender and adolescents' involvement in violent behavior. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 17(4), 297-310. Barnes, A., Cross, D., Lester, L., Hearn, L., Epstein, M., and Monks, H. (2012). The Invisibility of Covert Bullying Among Students: Challenges for School Intervention. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22(2), 206-226. Waters, S., Lester, L., Wenden, L., & Cross, D. (2012). A theoretically grounded exploration of the social and emotional outcomes of transition to secondary school. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22(2), 190-205. Cardoso, P., Thomas, L., Johnston, R., and Cross, D. (2012). Encouraging student access to and use of pastoral care services in schools. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22(2), 227-248. Lester, L., Dooley, J., Cross, D., Shaw, T. (2012). Internalising symptoms: An antecedent or precedent in adolescent peer victimization, Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22(2), 173-189. Lester, L., Cross, D., Dooley, J., Shaw, T. (2012). Developmental trajectories of adolescent victimization: Predictors and outcomes, Social Influence, 8(2-3), 107-130. Shaw, T., Cross, D. (2012). The clustering of bullying and cyberbullying behaviours within Australian schools. Australian Journal of Education, 56(2), 142-162. Cross, D. (2012). Editorial. Special Issue: The promotion of mental health and wellbeing in children and adolescents. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22(2), iii-v. Cross, D., Epstein, M., Hearn, L., Slee, P., Shaw, T., & Monks, H. (2011). National Safe Schools Framework: Policy and practice to reduce bullying in Australian schools. International Journal of Behavioural Development, 35(5), 398-404. Roberts, C., Williams, R., Kane R., Pintabona, Y. Cross, D., Zubrick, S., Silburn, S. (2011). Impact of a mental health promotion program on substance use in young adolescents. Advances in Mental Health, 10(1), 72-82. Cross, D., Hall, M, Shaw, T., Pintabona, Y., Erceg. E., Hamilton, G., Roberts, C., Waters, S., Lester, L. (2010). Three year results of the Friendly Schools whole-of-school intervention on children's bullying behaviour. British Educational Research Journal, 37(1): 105-129.
  • Authors

    Author(s)

    Donna Cross and Erin Erceg

    About author(s)

    Donna Cross is a Winthrop Professor with the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Western Australia, working from the affiliated Telethon Kids Institute. She was appointed Director of the new Early Childhood Development and Learning Collaboration, hosted by Telethon Kids Institute, in May 2016. The Collaboration's role is to bring together researchers with consumers, educators, leading clinicians and other practitioners to improve the development and learning of young children and support their families and communities. It will provide robust, practical evidence developed in a collaborative manner while maintaining high research integrity. For her services to children's health and wellbeing research, Donna received the 2012 WA Australian of the Year Award, and in 2015 was inducted as a Fellow to the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences. Most recently, Donna was awarded a Churchill Fellowship and a 2017 NHMRC Senior Fellowship. As an internationally-renowned academic, having contributed to research in the USA, Canada, Finland, Denmark, Japan and Israel. Donna has an international reputation for developing community-based interventions to reduce bullying and aggression among young people. She is currently a lead investigator on six 2-5 year longitudinal research projects developed to prevent bullying, cyberbullying and associated mental health harms among Australian children and adolescents. Her strong focus on translational strategies has culminated in the dissemination of an evidence-based program Friendly Schools Plus to over 3,000 Australian schools and schools in the USA and the UK and Scandinavia. Erin Erceg is an Honorary Research Associate with Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, and National Director of the Friendly Schools Project, Hawker Brownlow Education. Erin's most significant work in child and youth research relates to community-based interventions to reduce bullying and aggression among young people social and emotional learning, aggression and bullying among young people. She has been As one of the primary authors of the Friendly Schools suite of resources and has been directly involved in the research supporting this the Friendly Schools initiative since it began in 1999. She is a co-author, Director and lead trainer for Friendly Schools and has worked extensively with primary and secondary schools to reduce bullying and build social and emotional wellbeing in children and young people. Other areas of research contribution include: capacity building for wellbeing in schools; reducing and preventing cyber bullying; bullying in an Aboriginal context; secondary school transition factors; building school capacity to engage parents; and self-esteem and resilience in young people. Previous to this work Erin has worked as a teacher in both primary and secondary school classes, a development officer health and wellbeing programs and as a consultant with community builders and suicide prevention.